Irish and English tenor Joshua Spink is quickly becoming known for his pleasing tone, his comfortable high register and his impressive acting ability on stage. As of the 2020/2021 season, Joshua is a member of the solo ensemble at Theater Ulm. Roles there this season include debúts as Count Almaviva from Rossini's Il barbiere di Siviglia and Vánja from Janáček's Katya Kabanowa as well as Monostatos in a concert performance of Mozart's Die Zauberflöte

 

Joshua grew up in Ireland and read Spanish and music in University College Cork before completing his Masters in Music in the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama in Dublin with teachers Stephen Wallace and Sylvia O’Regan and répétiteur Mary Scarlett. During his time there he played the role of the First Elder in Handel’s staged oratorio Susanna in the Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin. Since 2018, the young tenor has been resident and working in Germany.

 

In 2018 Spink played the roles of Don Basilio and Don Curzio in Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro in Theater im Schlossgarten in Arnstadt, Germany, where his performance was described in review as being “reminiscent of the Commedia dell’arte” (Thüringer Allgemeine). In the same year Joshua also sung the roles of Simon Dedalus and Deasy in a concert performance of a new opera based on James Joyces' Ulysses of the same name before making his debút as Pedrillo in Mozart's Die Entführung aus dem Serail in Waidhofen/YBBS, Austria with the award winning OPER rund-um.

 

 

In the 2018/19 season, the young tenor toured the United States with Columbia Artist Management’s Songs of Ireland tour. Roles consisted of Doctor Blind in Strauss' Die Fledermaus and Monostatos in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte in Theater Mon Ami in Weimar as well as a role reprisal of Pedrillo at the Pasinger Fabrik in Munich for their summer and winter season.

In the 2019/2020 season Joshua sang with the ensemble of the Hamburger Kammeroper at the Allee Theater in Hamburg. Roles there included Lord Arturo in Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor (cancelled re. COVID 19) as well as Don Ramiro in Rossini’s La Cenerentola and Tamino in Mozart's Die Zauberflöte for the Theater’s Kinderoper.

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